Spring Hill Market newsletter archives AND announcements will be updated on a weekly basis.

After Market 5/7/2011

Spring Hill Farmer's Market

Well it’s official! Spring Hill Farmer’s Market is open for the season. Our grand opening was last Saturday and it was a beautiful market day. The weather was perfect and it was wonderful to meet and greet new and returning vendors and customers. I was amazed at the variety we have so early in the season. Leslie Birmingham with Sunflowers and Sunshine offers artesian jams and jellies, artesian breads and biscotti and handcrafted items. Kendra Cote with Amathia Soapworks offers handmade cold-pressed soap, bath and body products and herb sachets. Debbie Ford with Deborah’s Decorative Painting offers recycled beaded plates, bottles, flatware and handcrafted greeting cards. Rebeca Hazaleous and Johnna Ellis with Soap Mom Handcrafted Soaps offer handcrafted soaps, lip balms, bath fizzie cupcakes, facial cleansers, bath teas and candles. Peggy Hill and Beth Cupp are back with their delicious baked goods; breads, cookies, cinnamon rolls…and Beth has added some great woodworking items. Eleanor Hoffman with Rachael’s Organic Vegetables is new to market and will have a vast assortment of vegetables, fruits and herbs – all grow using organic practices. Last week she had incredible bags of salad mix. We have been eating salad all week and I can’t wait to get some more. Nancy Kalman with Pickings and Pumpkins will offer vegetables, small fruits and herbs. Lisa Kobel is back with her very sought after hand knitted dishcloths. Nikki Miller will be new to market with her personal artwork. John and Connie Murphy from Connie’s Potting Shed are back again with all types of florals. Last week they had plants and silk arrangements, and we are keeping our fingers crossed for those gorgeous fresh cut bouquets this week. How I have missed my fresh flowers over the winter. Josh and Chris Oliver with O’s Jelly have delicious homemade jam and jelly – and will do special orders and sugar free upon request!  Be sure and try anything with jalepeno…Mike Pierron with Mike’s Farm Fresh Food had honey, bedding plants, fruit bushes and will have lots of produce as the season progresses. He may also offer fresh eggs in coming weeks. Steve Windler is back with all his great decorative metal art. Dan Tatum will be joining us as the season progresses, as will Mark Angermayer (Tubby’s Fruits), Jeff Bingman (produce) and Natalie Wilkerson-Smith (produce). As you can see it is shaping up to be a great season and I am still receiving inquiries for future stalls. See the complete list of vendors at the end of the newsletter for more details on their seasonal offerings.

Congratulations to the winners of our opening weekend giveaways….Gloria Hicks won the embroidered market basket and Judy Derr won the beautiful hanging basket. We will have additional drawings this weekend as well. It promises to be a great day at market and when you have finished shopping with us head on down to the Business Expo and Daffodil Days for continued fun. It is going to be a great day in Spring Hill!

DON’T MISS THIS SATURDAY!  We will have special music as our favorite musicians “Lester and Friends” are back by popular demand. These guys were a huge success last season and we are so happy they are coming back. Not sure of the exact time yet, but we have discussed 9:30-10:00 AM as a starting time.

Why Eat Local? 

During the season we will explore some of the many reasons; health, nutritional and environmental, that we should try and eat local. The chemical Bisphenol A or “BPA” is receiving lots of attention again. Used as food-can liners its use has already been restricted in Canada and some US states and municipalities because of potential health effects. Consumer Reports (2009) testing of canned foods found that almost all of the 19 major name brand canned foods contain evidence of some BPA. The debate around BPA involves if and what is a safe level of ingestion and if it should come in contact with food at all. Sounds like a really good reason to eat local and fresh! Come to Farmers Market and “shake the hand that feeds you…”. Ask how your food was grown, enjoy it fresh picked from the garden…You will be glad you did. Some of our vendors and customers have formed relationships that endure from season to season. Get to know your grower.

Market and the Community

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. We have had ongoing participation from the American Legion, Festival Choral Society, Hillsdale Water Quality Project and St. Clare’s Episcopal Church. Please contact the Market Manager if you have a group that would like to participate. Many thanks to HWQP for hosting a “make and take” rain barrel workshop at market last week. Anyone interested could “make and take” home a completed rain barrel for only $10. It was a huge success and just in time to take advantage of those spring rains for our flower and veggie gardens.

I am asking all market customers and vendors to help support a very worthy cause again this year. Uplift Organization is in need of empty 12-16 oz and 2 liter plastic bottles w/lids. These bottles are filled with cold water and/or lemonade and handed out to the homeless here in KC. Please rinse out empty bottles and drop them off at the market manager’s booth on Saturday AM. Be sure to include the lids! We will collect bottles for the remainder of the market season. This is an opportunity to make a tremendous difference and it doesn’t cost you a penny. Simply gather up those empty bottles you were going to toss in the trash and recycle them in a way that serves others

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.  A special thanks to Ann Jensen for all her support of the market – she is one of our biggest fans and always promoting our community and its activities! Finally, many thanks to Walt Faber with Vista Signs for his ongoing support. Walt creates all our signage for market and offers a generous discount to any vendor or non-profit.

Calling All Cooks!

Please start thinking about some of your favorite recipes that you are willing to share. If they incorporate fresh, market ingredients all the better. Drop of your recipes at the Market Manager’s booth. I want to compile a Spring Hill Farmer’s Market Cookbook that we will sell (for a very reasonable price) later this season. All proceeds will be donated to a local Spring Hill charity. Recipes can be typed or hand written. Please include your name and phone number or email address in case I have any questions. I will publish the names (only) of contributors in the cookbook unless you tell me differently. I know we have some wonderful cooks in this community!

From Market to Table

 

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings. The Rhubarb is starting to appear at market so here is a recipe for basic Rhubarb Compote (fancy name for stewed rhubarb) shared by Simple Bites.

Recipe 1: Basic Rhubarb Compote

  • 6 cups fresh chopped rhubarb, washed
  • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/2 cup maple sugar or brown sugar
  1. Combine all ingredients in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan.
  2. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Cover and simmer gently for about five minutes. Rhubarb will begin to soften.
  3. Uncover and continue to cook another five minutes.
  4. Remove from heat, cool.

Makes about three cups.

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For Market Date May 7, 2011

Spring Hill Farmer's MarketJust a reminder that Spring Hill Farmer’s Market opens this Saturday, May 7th at 7:30 AM in the Elementary School Parking Lot on Webster. We have 9 returning and 7 new vendors registered at this point with more to come as the season progresses. Opening day will include a “Make and Take Rain Barrel Workshop” hosted by the Hillsdale Water Quality Project where participants will be able to take home a rain barrel for just $10. Last year’s workshop was a huge success. If you are interested, arrive early as quantities are limited.  There will also be drawings for door prizes just in time for Mother’s Day. Mark your calendars to come back the following Saturday (May 14th) for live music provided by Lester and Friends – our favorite musicians and then go on to attend the Business Expo and Daffodil Days.

This year’s market will have something for everyone. Based on seasonal availability  we will have several varieties of fruits including peaches, blackberries, raspberries, gooseberries, apricots and pears; produce that includes lettuce, salad mix, tomatoes, okra, cabbage, squash, potatoes, onions, cucumbers, artesian jams and jellies, artesian breads and biscotti,  handmade cold process soap, bath and body products, herb sachets, facial cleansers, bath teas, deodorants, beaded gift items, handcrafted greeting cards, assorted baked goods, traditional jams and jelly, fresh herbs, artwork, fresh cut flower bouquets, dried flower arrangements, wood chips for BBQ and decorative metal art for home and lawn….and that is just the beginning!

There will always be a cup of coffee waiting for you on market mornings. So come and enjoy the company of friends and neighbors, and the opportunity to buy some wonderful, fresh, local produce.

For any vendors that may need help with custom market signage, feel free to contact Walt at Vista Signs 913-636-5449. He offers a discount for all our vendors.

I look forward to seeing you on Saturday and throughout the season

Patti Stites

Market Manager

July 1st, 2010

Another wonderful day at market last Saturday. The weather has been cooperating lately so we are seeing more produce each week.  Last week we had green beans, potatoes, beets, green onions, radishes and tomatoes as well as fresh peaches, apricots and blackberries. We have baked goodsdoggie items, jams and jelly, artesian breadsfresh eggsfrozen pork products, frozen fruit, gourmet coffee and cut flower bouquets. We also have handcrafted gift items including knitted items, metal artwork, decorative beaded items, hand crafted aprons and handcrafted cards. Every week seems to bring new surprises. We were thrilled to welcome back Jeff Bingman and family last week and Debbie Ford joined us as a new vendor. This week I received a call from someone who makes pottery so hopefully they will be joining us as well. We are open every Saturday from 7:30 until noon through the end of September. We are open all holiday weekends including 4th of July weekend and Labor Day weekend so be sure to make Spring Hill Farmers Market part of your holiday weekend plans. Next week (July 10th)I hope to have a Jazz band join us…more details as they become available.

Why Eat Local?

Each week I present perspectives from different authorities on why it makes sense to eat locally. This week’s comments are taken from a blog called “Food for Thought” at www.myfoodthoughts.com.

‘Tis the season for…apricots, blueberries, raspberries, peaches and more. Summer is a great time to take advantage of the seasonal produce grown locally either at a Farmers Market or “Pick Your Own” Farm/Orchard. Not only is this a great way to get back in touch and in better control of your food system, but a great way to get children excited about healthy eating. Instead of unsuccessfully telling your children what to eat, allowing them to see where the foods come from, how it grows and pick their own is more likely to get them to eat it. Buying locally grown food has grown so much in popularity that there is a term used to describe these buyers, locavores. Locavores only eat foods that are grown within 100 miles of their residence. Some benefits to being a locavore are:

  1. Eating locally means you are eating seasonal produce. Only eating what is in season at the time ensures you have variety in your diet, one of the key components to a healthy lifestyle.
  2. Buying locally grown food helps reduce your carbon footprint since it reduces the use of fossil fuels needed for travel.
  3. Because there is less travel time, there are fewer chemicals used on the produce to ensure freshness by the time they arrive at their destination.
  4. Supporting local farmers since they are unlikely subsidized by the government, yet essential to sustain our eco and natural food systems.
  5. Locavores reestablish the personal connection between man and food by taking out the middleman and going straight to the source.
  6. Cutting out transit and processing time (think food conveyer belt) decreases the chance of food-borne illnesses, like salmonella. Despite logical thinking, the evolution of food processing to becoming more industrialized and done on a larger scale has increased potential points of cross-contamination from the time it is harvested and delivered to your plate.

Be your own locavore. Whether that means buying seasonal foods, taking a look at the sticker on fruits to see how far it traveled from harvest to the store (many fruits are from South America, imagine how many chemicals they used to keep it fresh and fossil fuel was used to get it there) or a more extreme pledge to eat only foods harvested within 100 miles of your home, the point is taking one step for a healthier you is a bigger step for your food system.

Michael Pollan, foods writer for the New York Times and author of In Defense of Food, put it best by writing, “Shake the hand that feeds you.” There is no better way to ensure your food is safe and naturally fresh than buying from the source.

I think that is my new favorite phrase and should be the motto of our market….”shake the hand that feeds you…”

Market and the Community

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. We have ongoing participation from the American Legion, the Spring Hill Rotary Club and St. Clare’s Episcopal Church. Last week we were delighted to have Spring Hill United Methodist Church and the Explorer’s Program from the Spring Hill Police Department..

On July 17th we will be having a rain barrel workshop hosted by Hillsdale Water Quality Project. This workshop will be the last one this year with only 26 rain barrels left to be distributed. Rain Barrels will be provided on first come first serve basis on this day only. Cost is only $10 with a limit of one rain barrel per household for Johnson County homeowners (all Spring Hill Residents will be accepted). Staff and volunteers will provide one-on-one instruction on how to make a rain barrel, information on its use, upkeep and important winterizing tips. This is an amazing opportunity for our market customers to “make and take” a rain barrel. You might want to get to market early that day. I have a feeling that at a price of $10 these will go quickly… Hillsdale Water Quality Project is a non-profit organization working to improve and restore water quality in Hillsdale Lake.

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings.

Glazed Green Onions

12-18 well developed green onions (including tops trimmed and cut into pieces

3 Tablespoon butter or bacon grease

3 Teaspoons sugar

½ cup water

Salt and pepper to taste

Place all ingredients in a skillet over medium heat. Simmer for 20 minutes or until the liquid is gone and the onions are glossy

Serve as a side dish or garnish for meat or vegetables.

Southwestern Corn and Zucchini Sauté

2 Tablespoons butter

1 large red bell pepper; stemmed, seeded and coarsely chopped

2 medium zucchini; trimmed halved lengthwise and sliced ¼ inch thick

3 cloves garlic minced

3 cups fresh corn kernels

½ cup chopped poblano pepper (more or less to taste)

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh oregano leaves or ¼ teaspoon dried oregano

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

Melt the butter in a large sauté pan. Add peppers, zucchini, garlic and sauté gently for 15 minutes until vegetables are just tender. Stir in corn, chili pepper, oregano, cumin, salt and pepper.

Continue cooking until corn is barely soft and the dish is heated through. About 5 minutes

Note: if poblano peppers are not available, jalapeños may be used. However they have a higher heat level so you may want to use less.

Corn Grilled with Seasoned Butter

8 Tablespoons softened butter

2 Tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves

2 Tablespoons minced fresh chives

1 Tablespoon minced fresh thyme leaves

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper – optional

8 ears fresh corn, husked and silk removed

Prepare a charcoal fire.

Place the butter, herbs and seasonings in a small bowl and mix well

Spread 1 Tablespoon of the flavored butter over each ear of corn and wrap each ear individually in foil. Grill over medium coals for 12-15 minutes or until corn is tender. Unwrap the corn and serve in its butter right away.

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June 24th, 2010

It was a great day at Spring Hill Farmers Market last week. The sun was shining and we didn’t have to duck for cover from rain. We are starting to see more and more produce each week as well as fresh fruit. So far we have had lettuce, spinach, green onions, radishes, beets, green beans, potatoes, and even a few tomatoes. All the fresh cherries are now gone but there are still frozen cherries for pies available and this week we will have fresh apricots! Think about bringing a cooler to market since there are also fresh eggs and frozen pork products available. We have several bakers at market this year that offer an assortment of sweet breads; banana, pumpkin, zucchini, apple spice and blueberry. We have European style artesian breads; French, rye and crusty white. We have had cherry pies, strudel and turnovers, muffins, brownies and cookies.  We also have wonderful cannoli. There is gourmet coffee, handcrafted items, jams and jelly and fresh cut flower bouquets. This week I hope to have another new crafter as Debbie Ford joins us with handcrafted decorative items. Dan and Michelle Nevius have indicated they will have sweet corn within the next couple of weeks. Check out our list of registered vendors at the end of the newsletter for more details on our 2010 vendors and what they offer.

Why Eat Local?

 

Each week I present perspectives from different authorities on why it makes sense to eat locally. This week’s comments are by Jennifer Maiser; editor of the Eat Local Challenge website – a place for authors nationwide to share their experiences with finding locally grown and locally produced food.

Maiser encourages us to become a “locavore” – an individual who pays attention to where their food comes from and commits to eating local food as much as possible. The great thing about eating local is that it’s not an all-or-nothing venture. Any small step you take helps the environment, protects your family’s health and supports small farmers in your area.

According to Maiser, the first step to being a locavore is to determine what local means for you. This is an individual decision that should feel comfortable for you and your family. Many locavores start by trying to eat within a 100-mile radius from their homes and then adjust where necessary, sometimes encompassing an area as large as an entire state or region. The important thing is that by creating a boundary, no matter how large, you are becoming conscious of food’s origin. All of our vendors live within a 50 mile radius of our market.

10 Ways to Become a Locavore

1) Visit a farmers’ market. Farmers’ markets keep small farms in business through direct sales. Rather than going through a middleman, the farmer takes home nearly all of the money that you hand him or her for a delectable apple or a wonderful bunch of grapes. Need to find a market in your area? Try the USDA’s farmers’ market guide.

2) Lobby your supermarket. Ask your supermarket manager where your meat, produce and dairy is coming from. Remember that market managers are trained to realize that for each person actually asking the question, several others want to know the same answer. Let the market managers know what’s important to you! Your show of interest is crucial to help the supermarket change its purchasing practices.

3) Choose 5 foods in your house that you can buy locally. Rather than trying to source everything locally all at once, try swapping out just 5 local foods. Fruits and vegetables that can be grown throughout the continental U.S. include apples, root vegetables, lettuce, herbs and greens. In most areas, it’s also possible to find meat, poultry, eggs, milk, and cheese—all grown, harvested and produced close to your home.

4) Find a local CSA and sign-up! Through a CSA—Community Supported Agriculture—program you invest in a local farm in exchange for a weekly box of assorted vegetables and other farm products. Most CSA programs provide a discount if you pre-pay for your share on a quarterly or yearly basis because a pre-payment allows the farm to use the cash in the springtime when money is needed for farm equipment or investment in the farm. CSA programs take the work out of buying local food, as the farmer does the worrying for you.

5) Preserve a local food for the winter. There’s still time! Though we are headed into winter, many areas still have preservable fruits and vegetables available. Try your hand at making applesauce, apple butter and quince paste. To learn about safe preserving techniques, go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

6) Find out what restaurants in your area support local farmers. You can do this by asking the restaurants about their ingredients directly, or by asking your favorite farmers what restaurant accounts they have. Frequent the businesses that support your farmers.

7) Host a local Thanksgiving. Participate in the 100-mile Thanksgiving project by making a dish or an entire meal from local foods.

8) Buy from local vendors. Can’t find locally grown? How about locally produced? Many areas have locally produced jams, jellies and breads as well as locally roasted coffee and locally created confections. While these businesses may not always use strictly local ingredients in their products, by purchasing them you are supporting the local economy.

9) Ask about origins. Not locally grown? Then where is it from? Call the producer of your favorite foods to see where the ingredients are from. You’ll be amazed how many large processed food companies are unable to tell you where your food came from. By continuing to ask the questions we are sending a message to the companies that consumers want to know the origin of ingredients.

10) Visit a farm. Find a farm in your area and call to make an appointment to see the farm. When time allows, the farmers are usually happy to show a family or a group around the farm. When you visit, ask the farmers what challenges they have had and why they choose to grow what they are growing. Be sure to take the kids along on this journey! Children need to know where their food is coming from in order to feel a sense of connection to their dinner.

http://www.pbs.org/now/shows/344/locavore.html

Market and the Community

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. This weekend we are having a bake sale hosted by the Spring Hill Police Department’s Explorer’ Program. I believe that Spring Hill United Methodist Church and St. Clare’s Episcopal Church will also be on hand.

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings.

Summer Corn and Tomato Salad

5 cups fresh corn kernels (from about 10 large ears)

¼ cup safflower or canola oil

3 T raspberry vinegar

Juice of 1 lime

Salt and Pepper to taste

4 ripe tomatoes; cored, seeded and coarsely chopped

10 scallions; white and light green parts chopped

¼ cup chopped cilantro (optional – however cilantro and the lime juice are a nice pairing…)

Bring salted water to a boil. Place corn kernels in a vegetable steamer basket, cover and steam until just crisp tender – about 3-5 minutes

Meanwhile whisk the oil, vinegar and lime juice together in a small bowl and season with salt and pepper

Combine the corn, tomatoes, scallions and cilantro in a large bowl. Toss with the dressing and serve at room temperature or chilled. The salad will keep (covered and refrigerated) for up to 3 days)

Taken from Hay Day Country Market Cookbook (1998) by Kim Rizk. Workman Publishing New York.

Green Beans and New Potatoes – My Grandma’s recipe….no she wasn’t Paula Deen – it just seems that way because of the bacon grease….

Chop several slices of bacon and brown in a deep skillet or saucepan

Add washed (unpeeled) new potatoes cut in half (this lets them get nice and brown and crispy in the bacon grease). Cook just until cut side in browned

Add fresh green beans and a little liquid. I have used water or a little stock.

Cover and cook on low-med heat until green beans are tender. Stir occasionally.

Careful when you stir green beans – so you don’t break up the potatoes – they get soft when they are fully cooked.

About Apricots…We are so fortunate to have fresh picked apricots at market. Fresh, ripe apricots are a boon when found since they do not travel well. This is why you never see fresh apricots in the produce section of the grocery store. Harvest season in the US for apricots is June  – Mid August depending on variety and location. Apricots are high in vitamin A,  They are also high in vitamin C and potassium as well as being low in fat and cholesterol-free. One apricot averages less than 20 calories, making it a perfect sweet snack.

Apricot Nectar

1 quart apricots
1/2 cup sugar
1 quart water
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

Wash and pit fresh fruit.  Boil fruit and water 5 minutes.   Strain.  Add sugar and lemon juice and bring to a boil.  Makes 1 1/2 quarts.

Pickled Apricots –An elegant accompaniment to meat and poultry

7 lbs apricots(unpeeled, whole)
6 cinnamon sticks
4 lbs. sugar(may be all or part brown sugar)
whole cloves
1 pint vinegar

Wash apricots and stick 2-3 cloves into each one.  Boil cinnamon sticks and vinegar together.  Put apricots into syrup and boil gently until soft, but not mushy.   Pack into sterilized hot jars with one cinnamon stick in each jar- seal at once. Water bath in a canner for 5 minutes.

Brandied Apricots
Follow directions for pickled apricots.  Add 1 Tbsp. brandy to each pint of pickled apricots just before sealing.

Fresh Apricot Dessert Topping

2 cups sliced fresh apricots
1 Tbsp. granulated sugar
2 Tbsp. apricot nectar or orange juice
Muscat dessert wine

Mix everything together. Use as a topping for pound cake, ice cream, frozen yogurt, etc.

Registered Vendors and Their Seasonal Offerings

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June 15th, 2010

It was quite a day at Spring Hill Farmers Market last Saturday. We were having a great time; lots of vendors, customers, coffee and conversation and then the rains came….and kept coming. Our vendors ducked for cover under their canopies or in their vehicles hoping to wait it out. However, it soon became apparent that the rain was here to stay so they packed it up and headed home to dry out around 10 AM. I’m not sure how much rain was received in town, but our rain gauge indicated over three inches by mid afternoon. I don’t think I ever remember being so wet!!!  I was so disappointed that we were rained out because our customers didn’t get the opportunity to experience all our great vendors. We are starting to see some wonderful produce every week from Dan Tatum, Nancy Kalman, George Wright, Joe and Josh Wilson and Lisa Simms. We have had delicious asparagus, potatoes, peas, beets, lettuce, green onions and assorted radishes. Did I mention that we had a few tomatoes last week? Some of our growers have high tunnels or greenhouses, so they are able to start their plants much earlier than we backyard gardeners. We have sweet breads, brownies and cookies from Peg Hill and Beth Cupp, unique cookies and muffins from Brian Lami and European style artesian breads from Claudia Beverlin. Heather Anderton offers seasonal fresh fruit. Currently she has fresh cherries and they go fast. Last week she also had cherry pie, cherry strudel, cherry jam and great handcrafted aprons for sale. She informed me there is about one more week of cherries. She also has frozen cherries available if you want to avoid the whole cherry pitting exercise. Later we will see apricots, peaches, blackberries and apples. I hope she turns those into pie as well….Dianne Garcia is offering items for your four-legged friends; including home baked dog treats. Jennifer Hanson and her family have joined us with Simply Bold Ltd. a gourmet coffee roaster. Their coffee is roasted and packaged locally and it is delicious. They have generously donated coffee for us to serve our customers and it was a big hit last week. We are currently serving the 1/3 signature blend but they have many varieties and sizes to choose from. How many farmers markets give you complimentary, gourmet coffee? Lisa Kobel has quite a following for her hand knitted dishcloths. I know that I have several in my kitchen. John and Connie Murphy have fabulous cut flower bouquets in several sizes and price ranges. Chris Oliver from O’s Jelly offers several types of jelly including some rather unique flavor combinations. I know he does customer requests so if you don’t see it just ask. Robin Wheatley has some great handcrafted items. Her booth is a favorite with all the families and children that come to market. Her items are unique and affordable for the kids. Robin uses candy and recycled games in some of her crafts. Steve and Penny Windler offer decorative metal art. They have a huge inventory available for sale and a catalog of special order options.

We are so excited to welcome another new vendor; Heidi Rollins with her Holy Cannoli! You have got to taste these…oatmeal cannoli with a maple cream filling and they are superb! Heidi told me these creations were the result of a mistake….because she couldn’t seem to make an oatmeal cookie that didn’t spread out too thin. I guess when life hands you lemons make lemonade (or limoncello) and when it hands you flat oatmeal cookies make cannoli! It works for me.  Heidi will also offer oat and berry scones. BTW, we actually have lemonade available from little Mia Anderton for only .50 cents a glass so please stop in. I heard that Jeff Bingman will be back with fresh produce in the next week or so. Many of you became acquainted with Jeff’s mom and dad when they helped out at market last season.  Key Dynamics Chiropractic will be joining us periodically this season to offer complimentary health/spinal screenings and wellness tips. At the end of the month Debbie Ford will be joining with her handcrafted items. Debbie is well known at many local craft sales and gift shops and ships her items all over the country. She offers decorative serving pieces, incorporating recycled plates and wine bottles, for your home as well as beaded fly swatters and handmade greeting cards.  She does special orders as well.

I can’t begin to tell you how thrilled I am with market this year. We not only have our long term vendors, many who have been here for over 10 years and have a huge and loyal customer base. We are also continually adding new vendors with unique products. I feel we truly have something for everyone. Just take a look at the variety of items offered. This is Father’s Day weekend so why not do some of your shopping at Spring Hill Farmers Market? I know you would find something he would love and it supports our local community. Remember, we are a producers market so everything is home grown, hand crafted, home baked, or locally produced within 50 miles of Spring Hill. We have the best and friendliest vendors around!

Why Eat Local?

 

Each week I present perspectives from different authorities on why it makes sense to eat locally. This week’s comments are from John E. Ikerd; Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics University of Missouri Columbia who has developed his own Top Ten Reasons for Eating Local…

10.  Eating local eliminates the middlemen. Buying food locally saves on transportation and energy and virtually eliminates wasteful spending for unnecessary packing and advertising, which together account for more than 20-percent of total food costs.

9.   Eating local saves on transportation. The most recent estimates indicate that the average fresh food item travels about 1,500 miles from its points of production to final purchase.[i][9] Reducing transportation doesn’t save much in terms of dollars and cents, since total transportation costs amounts to only about four-percent of food costs. However, the ecological savings may be far more significant. Energy for transportation is virtually all derived from non-renewable fossil fuels. In addition, transportation is a major contributor to air pollution, particularly carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses. So eating local can make a significant contribution to sustainability, even if only by making a strong personal statement in favor of reducing our reliance on non-renewable energy and protecting the natural environment.

8.   Eating local improves food quality. Local foods can be fresher, more flavorful, and nutritious than can fresh foods shipped in from distant locations. According to most surveys, this reason would top most lists of those who choose to eat locally. In addition to the obvious advantage in freshness, growers who produce for local customers need not give priority to harvesting, packing, shipping, and shelf life qualities, but instead can select, grow, and harvest crops to ensure peak qualities of freshness, nutrition, and taste. Eating local also encourages eating seasonally, in harmony with the natural energy of a particular place, which is becoming an important aspect of quality for those of the new food culture.

7.   Eating local makes at-home eating worth the time and effort. Obviously, preparing local foods, which typically are raw or minimally processed, requires additional time and effort. But, the superior natural quality of local foods allows almost anyone to prepare really good foods at home, with a reasonable amount of time and effort. Chefs at high-end restaurants freely admit they prefer locally grown food items in part because of their ease of preparation. Good local foods taste good naturally, with little added seasoning and with little cooking or slow cooking, which requires little attention. Home preparation of raw foods also saves money, particularly compared with convenience foods, which makes really good food affordable for almost anyone who can and will prepare them from scratch, regardless of income. Preparing and eating meals at home also provides opportunities for families to share quality time together in creative, productive, and rewarding activities, which contribute to stronger families, communities, and societies.

6.   Eating local provides more meaningful food choices. Americans often brag about the incredible range of choices that consumers have in the modern supermarket today. Admittedly, shoppers are confronted with a vast array of sizes, shapes, and colors of foods from every corner of the world. In many respects, however, food choices are severely limited. Virtually all of food items in supermarkets and franchise restaurants today are produced using the same mass-production, industrial methods, with the same negative consequences for the natural environment and for civil society. In addition, the variety in foods today is largely cosmetic and superficial, contrived to create the illusion of diversity and choice where none actually exists. By eating local, food buyers can get the food they actually prefer rather than accept whatever is offered in the supermarket. They can buy foods that are authentically different, not just in physical qualities but also in the ecological and social consequences of how they are produced. They can choose to pay the full cost of food, rather support the exploitation of society and the environment.

5.   Eating local contributes to the local economy. American farmers, on average, receive only about 20 cents of each dollar spent for food, the rest going for processing, transportation, packing, and other marketing costs. Farmers who sell food direct to local customers, on the other hand, receive the full retail value, a dollar for each food dollar spent. Of course, each dollar not spent at a local supermarket or eating establishment, detracts from the local economy. However, less than one-third of total food costs go to local workers in supermarkets and restaurants, most of the rest goes outside of the local community. So the local food economy gains about three dollars for each dollar lost when food shoppers choose to buy from local farmers.

American farmers, on average, get to keep only ten to fifteen cents from each dollar they receive; the rest goes for fertilizer, fuel, machinery, and other production expenses – items typically manufactured and often provided by suppliers outside of the local community. Farmers who market locally, on the other hand, often get to keep half or more of each food dollar they receive, because they purchase fewer commercial production inputs. They receive a larger proportion of the total as a return for their labor, management, and entrepreneurship because they contribute a larger proportion to the production process. Those who sell locally also tend to spend locally, both for their personal and farming needs, which also contribute more to the local economy. So, eating local contributes to both the local food and farm economies.

4.   Eating local helps save farmland. More than one million acres of U.S. farmland is lost each year to residential and commercial development. The loss may seem small in relation to the total of more than 950 million acres of farmland, but an acre lost to development may mean an acre lost forever from food production. We are still as dependent upon the land for our very survival today as when all people were hunters and gatherers, and future generations will be no less dependent than we are today. Our dependencies are more complex and less direct, but certainly are no less critical. Eating local creates economic opportunities for caring farmers to care for their land, even when confronted by development pressures on the urban fringes. Their neighbors are their market, as well as their community. Wherever people are willing to pay the full ecological and social costs of food, farms can be very desirable places to live on and to live around. Eating local may allow new residential communities to be established on farms in urbanizing areas, with residences strategically placed to retain the most productive land in farming. These new sustainable communities could be built around the common interest in good food and good lifestyles of members of the new food and farming culture.

3.   Eating local allows people to reconnect. The industrial food system was built upon a foundation of impersonal economic relationships among farmers, food processors, food distributors, and consumers. Its economic efficiency demands that relationships among people and between people and nature be impartial, and thus impersonal. As a result, many people today have no meaningful understanding of where their food comes, and thus, no understanding of the ecological and social consequences of its production. By eating local, people are able to reconnect with local farmers, and through local farmers, reconnect with the earth. Many people first begin to understand the critical need for this lost sense of connectedness when they develop personal relationships with their farmers and actually visit the farms where their food is produced. We cannot build a sustainable food system until people develop a deep understanding of their dependency upon each other and upon the earth. Thus, in my opinion, reconnecting is one of the most important reasons for eating local.

2.   Eating local restores integrity to the food system. The new sustainable food system must be built upon personal relationships of integrity. When people eat locally, farmers form relationships with customers who care about the social and ecological consequences of how their food in produced – not just lower price, more convenience, or even an organic label. Those who eat locally form relationships with farmers who care about their land, care about their neighbors, and care about their customers – not just about maximizing profits and growth. Such relationships become relationships of trust and integrity, based on honesty, fairness, compassion, responsibility, and respect. Eating local provides people with an opportunity not only to reconnect personally, but also, to restore integrity to our relationships with each other and with the earth. In today’s society, there should be few, if any, higher priorities.

1.    Eating local helps build a sustainable society. The underlying problems of today’s food and farming systems are but reflections of deeper problems within the whole of American society. We are degrading the ecological integrity of the earth and the social integrity of our society in our pursuit of narrow, individual economic self-interests. As we begin to realize the inherent benefits of relationships of integrity within local food systems, we will begin the process of healing the ecological and social wounds that plague modern society.  Thus, my (Professor Ikerd’s) number one reason for eating local is to help build a new, sustainable American society.

www.ssu.missouri.edu/faculty/jikerd/…/Alabama-Eat%20Local.htm

 

Market and the Community

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. This weekend we are having a bake sale to benefit the Summer Sack Lunch program provided through the SH Multi Service Center. I believe the SH Rotary Club is joining to promote their fundraiser that involves golf balls. Next week Spring Hill United Methodist Church will be with us. SHUMC has had a presence in our community since 1858. They do so much for our community, including sponsoring a monthly community meal at no cost. Meals are the 3rd Thursday of every month and held at the SH Civic Center. They are a wonderful opportunity for fellowship. St. Clare’s Episcopal Church has been a regular attendee at market this season. They are planting a new church in Spring Hill and taking the opportunity to introduce themselves to the community. They are hosting a huge “Party in the Park” this coming Saturday from 10-2 at the City Park. There will be free food, activities for the kids and music. After you leave market be sure to go over to the park and check it out. Grilled hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken breasts….I know where I am going for lunch. Is there an age limit on that bouncy house??? In future weeks we will have the SHPD Explorers Program and the SH Lions Club. Another exciting event will be July 17th when we have a rain barrel workshop. Customers will be able to have a rain barrel constructed and purchase them for only $10. If you have priced the materials for a rain barrel lately you realize what a fabulous opportunity this will be. There will be a limited quantity available so stay tuned for more details. I would love to have some music at market. If you know of anyone that would be willing to perform please let me know. I hope to have a jazz band sometime this summer.  

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings

Simple Beet Salad

2# assorted medium beets

1/3 cup basalmic Vinaigrette (bottled or make your own)

Salt and Pepper to taste

½ cup chopped walnuts

Garnish with fresh parsley leaves

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Divide beets between 2 large pieces of heavy duty foil. Drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette, and sprinkle with desired amount of salt and pepper. Seal foil, making two loose packets.

Bake at 400 degrees for 45-55 minutes – until fork tender

Let cool one hour in packets, reserving liquid that accumulates

Bake walnuts at 400 degrees in a single layer in a shallow pan for 8-10 minutes until fragrant and toasted

Peel beets and cut or slice into wedges. Arrange on a serving platter or in a bowl. Drizzle with reserved liquid and sprinkle with walnuts

Southern Living Magazine May 2010

We will soon be seeing lots of types of basil at Farmers Market. Here is some insight on the different varieties and their uses.

Red Rubin – Use fresh in recipes, or as a garnish or for colorful vinegars. Also known as “Opal”. Very Fragrant.

Genovese – The favorite basil for pesto, also for use fresh in recipes or as a garnish. Sometimes called “Sweet Basil”.

Mammoth – The pick for lots of pesto. Large, crinkled, light green leaves. You can even use whole leaves on sandwiches.

Thai – Licorice scented leaves bring out the flavors of other ingredients. Use in Asian dishes such as stir fry.

Cuban – Small leaves on a globe shaped plant. Ideal for containers. Adds a spicy kick to salsa.

Purple Ruffles – Frilly, purple leaves and intense fragrance – the most beautiful in the garden

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June 9th, 2010

What a wonderful day at market last Saturday. The weather is starting to warm and we are seeing the results in our vendor’s offerings. Last week George Wright had 3 kinds of radishes, green onions, asparagus, kale and some flowering bedding plants. Dan Tatum joined us for the first time this season with fresh produce that included peas and potatoes. We are also happy to welcome two new vendors to SHFM. Heather Anderton of Amazing Grace Acres joins us with fresh produce, and wonderful fruit. Last week she had two kinds cherries from her orchard, and some delicious jars of homemade cherry jam. She promises that during the season she will bring us not only cherries, but apricots, peaches, blackberries, apples and cut flowers. I am sure we will see some more jam and she also sews some great aprons. Her youngest daughter is also going to set up a lemonade stand. Our 2nd new vendor is Jennifer Hanson with Simply Bold Ltd. a local company that roasts and packages gourmet coffee. She will have 2 oz, 12 oz, 2# and 5# packages of Columbian, Mexican, Ethiopian and Organic Peruvian coffees as well as their 1/3 Signature Blend and several flavored coffees. Jennifer has generously donated some of the Signature Blend for us to sample as our complimentary coffee next week. I can’t wait to try it and the packaging is fabulous. It would make wonderful gifts. Lonnie Beverlin was at market with wife Claudia’s Artesian Breads as well as fresh eggs and frozen pork products. Once we have tomatoes at market, it will be one stop shopping for those BLT’s.  We always have cookies and muffins from Brian Lami, delicious sweet breads, brownies and cookies from Peg and Beth, fabulous flower bouquets from Connie and John Murphy, decorative metal works from Steve and Penny Windler, unique jams and jelly from O’s Jelly, knitted dishcloths from Lisa Kobel, and a wide selection of produce and herbs from Nancy Kalman and also Lisa Simms. Don’t forget your four legged friends because Dianne Garcia makes dog treats. It just keeps getting better every week. Our friend and favorite woodworker, John Onions stopped by last week and should be joining us shortly. Don’t forget that Father’s Day is just a week away and we have lots of options at the market. Give Dad something unique and local.

Think about making the market a part of your Saturday “routine”. Stop in and get a complimentary cup of coffee, shop a little and take the time to visit with your neighbors. We actually have local residents that come to market every Saturday morning, pull up a lawn chair and visit for an hour so. It is amazing who you see at market and what a great time you can have. It reminds me of my childhood in Iowa, when my grandparents always took us to town on Saturday night. It was the only time the stores stayed open late (8pm). The town was built in a square fashion and everyone came to town, shopped for groceries, parked around the square and visited for the evening. Top that off with a visit to the A&W for a root beer float or DQ for a parfait and life didn’t get any better. I still love small towns!

Why Eat Local?

What exactly is local food?
Talk of local food is everywhere. But what does it mean? How local is local? Local is shorthand for an idea that doesn’t have a firm definition. Unlike organic standards, which entail specific legal definitions, inspection processes, and labels, local means different things to different people, depending on where they live, how long their growing season is, and what products they are looking for.

Practically speaking, local food production can be thought of in concentric circles that start with growing food at home. The next ring out might be food grown in our immediate community – then state, region, and country. For some parts of the year or for some products that thrive in the local climate, it may be possible to buy closer to home. At other times, or for less common products, an expanded reach may be required.

People who value local as their primary food criterion are sometimes referred to as locavores. The term “locavore” was coined by Jessica Prentice from the San Francisco Bay Area for World Environment Day 2005 to describe and promote the practice of eating a diet consisting of food harvested from within an area most commonly bound by a 100 mile radius. With such excitement and momentum building in the local food movement, the New Oxford American Dictionary chose locavore as its word of the year in 2007.

One easy way to start buying local is to choose one product to focus on. Vegetables are often a good place to start. Produce also offers a good introduction to eating seasonally—an excellent way to learn about local agriculture. Then, try seeking out sources for local meat or dairy. how to make buying local fun and easy. With a pantry and fridge full of beautiful, local foods, you may want to start experimenting in the kitchen..

While local is certainly a flexible term, the basic concept is simple: local foods are produced as close to home as possible. Buying local supports a more sustainable food system because true sustainability goes beyond the methods used in food production to include every step that brings food from farm to plate. http://www.sustainabletable.org/issues/eatlocal/

Market and the Community

 

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. The American Legion joins us every week and will be giving away a free flag in June, July, August and September. The Rotary Club is having a fundraiser that involves golf balls – you can buy boxes of brand name balls for personal use or gifts or can buy an individual numbered golf ball that will be dropped out of a helicopter over the golf course later this summer. The prizes are great so ask for details. The Rotary plans to be with us June 19th and at least twice a month during the season. Pastor Pip, from St. Clare’s Episcopal Church is at market on a weekly basis getting to know the community and sharing his vision for their new church. Be sure and ask him about the big “Party in the Park” that St. Clare’s is hosting for the community on June 19th. St. Clare’s is also hosting a Dave Ramsey Financial Peace University course, open to the community. The class is in progress but there is going to be an opportunity to sit in on a session for free. Pastor Pip has the details. There is a huge bake sale planned for June 19th to benefit the Spring Hill Multi-Service Center – specifically the Summer Sack Lunch Program. Spring Hill has over 200 children that receive either free or reduced lunches during the school year.  Once school is out, they no longer have the opportunity for a nutritious lunch. The MSC has a program whereby parents can pick up a week’s worth of sack lunches for their children during the summer months. The community is going all out to support this initiative. All the local churches have been asked to participate by donating baked goods. Please lend whatever support you can for this worthwhile project. Spring Hill is one of the most caring and supportive communities I have ever experienced, so there is no doubt this will be a huge success. The Explorer’s Program sponsored by the SHPD will be having bake sales on June 26th, July 3rd and July 10th to support their programming. It’s shaping up to be a great summer! This is the last Saturday that you can purchase tickets for the Festival Choral Society Dinner Theater Benefit – “Ol Blue Eyes” to be performed on June 19th at the Community Center. See the market manager for additional information or tickets.

The Market also provides a weekly stall for local business participation. These businesses have the opportunity to promote their products and services and in return generously provide the doughnuts for our vendors and customers. Please contact the market manager if you are interested.

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings.

I have to admit I was surprised when my friend, Lawrence McPherson started buying up all the market radishes to make what he called a “radish sandwich”. White bread, butter, sliced white icicle radishes….I mentioned it to another friend, Eric Jones and he had a different take on radishes and how they were used with butter as an appetizer in Europe. I started digging through the cookbooks and sure enough I found it in Ina Garten’s – Barefoot Contessa in Paris Cookbook. Here’s a recipe for an easy appetizer taken from The Gardener’s Community Cookbook, by Victoria Wise.

Radish and Chive Canapés

8 ounces quality cream cheese – softened

1T butter – softened

½ to ¾ cup finely chopped red radishes

½ cup chopped fresh chives

Salt

Pumpernickel triangles and or small cocktail rye bread rounds

Thinly sliced radish rounds

In a bowl, beat together the cheese and butter until fluffy. Lightly squeeze the chopped radishes to press out extra moisture and add to the bowl. Add the chopped chives and mix well. Season with salt to taste, cover and refrigerate until firm but still spreadable. At least one hour or overnight.

Top the bread with the spread and garnish with the sliced radish rounds.
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June 2nd, 2010

It was another wonderful market day last Saturday and we were delighted that so many residents decided to make us part of their Memorial Day Weekend.  Each week as the sun shines and the weather warms we are seeing a greater variety of produce. In addition to several varieties of radishes, green onions and asparagus we added beets and cauliflower last week. We also had some delicious baked goods, flowering and vegetable bedding plants, jams and jelly, local honey, hand knitted items, decorative metal work, cut flower bouquets, artesian bread, farm fresh eggs and we welcomed another new vendor. Welcome to Dianne Garcia who offers homemade dog treats and other pet related items. She handed out samples to some of our 4-legged regulars and they seemed quite impressed. (Teddy was already unhappy that he didn’t get to come to market so I didn’t mention the new treats. No point in adding insult to injury). Joe and Josh Wilson also returned for the first time this season with fresh produce. Heather Anderton stopped by to let me know she will be joining us in the next week or two with fresh cherries. Throughout the season she will offer apricots, blackberries, peaches and apples. Michele Nevius also checked in to reserve a spot. She and her husband Dan have great veggies, including sweet corn. We have so many wonderful vendors and our local growers are so knowledgeable. We are proud to boast 3 vendors; Nancy Kalman, Connie Murphy and Lisa Simms who are certified Master Gardeners. If you have any garden related questions these are the subject matter experts. So stop by and chat with them.

Why Eat Local?

 

If your food travels more than you do, it may be time to make a change in your diet. With all its garden bounty, summer is the perfect time to “healthy up” your meals. These tips are offered by Michael Pollan, author of the new health conscious eater’s manual, Food Rules. Are you hungry? Eat an apple. Make the rule of thumb: if you are not hungry enough to eat an apple, you’re not really that hungry. Add garden fresh snacks like carrots and radishes to your diet instead of chips and other processed foods. Have a food treasure hunt. Find local farmers and growers and develop a relationship. For a fresh summer taste, chiffonade salad greens, add fresh herbs and toss with olive oil and lemon juice. Think about making all your own fresh salad dressings using basic ingredients you already have in your cabinets. Use oil, vinegar or a splash of citrus like orange or lemon juice, garlic, pepper and fresh herbs to taste. You will be surprised how different salad tastes when it is not covered up in heavy dressing. Fewer calories and no preservatives. Why not make a commitment to eat local and fresh for just one month; buying and trying new things from the market and local producers? The decision will benefit not only you and your family, but local growers as well.

 

You grow for yourself and you pass over the fence to your neighbor, How do you quantify the benefit of knitting a family or a neighborhood together?

Richard Doss

 

Market and the Community

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. Last week Time Warner Cable hosted a bake sale for Relay for Life. There were some great cakes, cookies, brownies and even pie. We also had a stall representing the Lyme Disease Association offering heirloom tomato plants. In future weeks we will have a bake sale to raise funds for the S H Multi-purpose Center Summer Sack Lunch Program. The Spring Hill Police Explorer Post Program – a junior officer program for high school students will also have a bake sale. It sounds like there will be plenty to eat this summer. Pastor Pip from St. Clare’s Episcopal Church joined us again as did the American Legion. It is wonderful to see so much community involvement and support for the market. There is still time to purchase tickets for the Encore Performance of Ol’ Blue EyesDinner Theater Benefit for the Festival Choral Society. Tickets are available at the market manager’s stall or by calling 592-2055. Advance sales only and the last day to buy tickets is June 16th.

The Market also provides a weekly stall for local business participation. These businesses have the opportunity to promote their products and services and in return generously provide the doughnuts for our vendors and customers. Thanks to Jackie Remington, the manager of Spring Hill Plaza Apartments for providing the treats last Saturday.

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.

 

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings

Spinach and Strawberry Salad

1# fresh spinach, stems removed, washed and spun dry

2 cups fresh strawberries, hulled and halved

Place the spinach and strawberries in a bowl and toss gently with Kentucky Salad Dressing (recipe below)

Kentucky Salad Dressing

¼ cup vegetable or olive oil

¼ cup cider vinegar

¼ – ½ cup sugar (to taste)

½ teaspoon minced onion

2 tablespoons sesame seeds (optional)

1 tablespoon poppy seeds

Dash of Worcestershire (optional)

Mix all ingredients in a blender or food processor until homogenized

Warm Roasted Beet Salad

 

1# mixed red and yellow beets; topped and rinsed

2 cups arugula or your other favorite salad greens; washed and spun dry

3 tablespoons fresh orange juice

1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

1 ½ teaspoons olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place the beets in a baking dish and sprinkle with a little water. Cover and cook in the oven until fork tender – about one hour. Remove and cool until able to handle. While still warm, slip the skins off the beets then slice into thin rounds. Transfer the beet rounds into a salad bowl and add the salad greens, oj, vinegar and olive oil. Toss to mix. Salt and pepper to taste. Toss again and serve.

Feta cheese crumbles make a nice addition to this salad

Compliments of Gardeners’ Community Cookbook, compiled and written by Victoria Wise.

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May 26th ~ After-Market Newsletter:

What a glorious day at market it was! The weather was absolutely perfect; sunny and warm. We had great produce; both red and white radishes, asparagus, green onions and rhubarb. Now that the weather is cooperating we will be adding more produce each week. Remember we are a producer’s market and everything is grown within 50 miles of Spring Hill so weather is a factor… We also had honey, hand crafted knitted items and gorgeous cut flower bouquets. There were some vegetable and flowering bedding plants for those do it yourself gardeners. There were also delicious baked goods and homemade jams and jelly. We were excited to add three new vendors on Saturday. Charles Brink joined us with some wonderful wooden handcrafted items Charles carves beautiful wooden walking sticks, canes, lamp bases, crosses and jewelry boxes and offers bags of cedar shavings for your closets and drawers. Lisa Sims is back and her stall is always a favorite. Lisa offers a huge assortment of fresh vegetables during the season that will include beets, okra, fennel, spinach and soy beans. She also offers assorted herbs, homemade horehound candy, decorative gourds and bittersweet and will be displaying her personal photography items this year. Steve and Penny Windler joined us as new vendors with some fantastic decorative metal art. Be sure and check out their stall. You can find something for your favorite team, pet or hobby. I am the proud owner of a metal rooster on a stake that is guarding my garden. Since it is probably the only chicken my husband will ever let me have – I am delighted! However, the barn cats are not real sure what is going on….

Just a reminder…Spring Hill Farmers Market will be open this (Memorial Day) weekend.. Make us part of your holiday weekend!

Why Eat Local?

 

Does your food travel more than you do? Each week I will try and share some perspectives on why we should eat locally. In the space of a generation, we’ve become accustomed to eating food that’s never grown roots in local soil. In fact, most produce grown in the United States travels an average of 1,500 miles before it gets sold. Trucking, shipping and flying in food from around the country and the globe takes a toll on the environment and on public health. Take grapes, for example. Every year, nearly 270 million pounds of grapes arrive in California, most of them shipped from Chile to the Port of Los Angeles. Their 5,900 mile journey in cargo ships and trucks releases 7,000 tons of global warming pollution each year, and enough air pollution to cause dozens of asthma attacks and hundreds of missed school days in California. The way we eat has an enormous impact on the health of the planet. By choosing to eat lower on the food chain, and focusing on local and organic produce, we can curb global warming and air pollution, avoid toxic pesticides, support local farmers and enjoy fresh, tasty food. Taken from the National Defenses Resource Council website http://www.nrdc.org/health/foodmiles/.

Market and the Community

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. This week we will be hosting a group from Time Warner Cable with a bake sale to support Relay for Life. This is fundraiser for cancer so please stop by and lend your support for this very important cause. Additionally, we are so pleased to have the Cole-Smith Post 350 of the American Legion joining us on a weekly basis. They are selling raffle tickets on a telescoping flag pole and also giving away a free flag at market in June, July, August and September. Stop by and chat with them and pick up a ticket for the free flag drawings. Also, if you have a torn or worn flag that needs to be “retired” you can leave it with them for proper handling. These guys do so many great things in the community it is an honor to have them as a part of our market. You can also purchase tickets from the Festival Choral Society for their upcoming “Ol Blue Eye” Dinner Theater Benefit, June 19th. The Festival Choral Society is a 501C3 nonprofit community choral arts organization and is incorporated by the State of Kansas. Organized in 2005, the choir and ensemble have performed Christmas and Spring concerts for our community as well as performing with professional musicians and vocalists for the benefit of having such talent for their audiences to hear and experience. Membership of the choir and ensemble stretches from all over our area, including, Spring Hill, Louisburg, Paola, Gardner, and the Greater Kansas City area. Their concerts are made possible through fundraising and the generous support of individuals, area businesses and civic organizations. This is an encore presentation that sold out last year. Seating is limited so make sure and get your tickets early. Advance sales only. Last week we were joined by the Spring Hill Rotary Club, which was selling boxes of golf balls for all you duffers. They also have a great fundraiser going on throughout the summer. You purchase a golf ball (numbered) and then this fall they will drop all the golf balls from a helicopter over the golf course and the ball(s) closest to the hole wins. There are some great prizes; a trip, a big screen television etc. They will be joining us periodically during the season so be sure and stop by their stall and buy a ball, or two, or three….I think they are $5 each or 5/$20. The Rotary Club has done some great work around eliminating Polio  throughout the world. We were delighted to have Pastor Pip from St. Clare’s Episcopal Church join us for the first time. St. Clare’s is a new church in Spring Hill that is currently meeting at the Gathering Place on Main street. They are also offering a Dave Ramsey Financial Peace University course that will be starting in June. Many of you may listen to Dave on radio or television. This is open to the community so stop by and get the details from Pastor Pip – he is the animated guy (lots of coffee) meeting and greeting all over the market. Please contact the market manager if you have a group that would like to participate in the market or if you have suggestions. Would there be any interest in having an informational booth from either Miami or Johnson County Extension Service? 4-H demonstrations or exhibits? Just let me know.

The Market also provides a weekly stall for local business participation. These businesses have the opportunity to promote their products and services and in return generously provide the doughnuts for our vendors and customers. Thanks to Art Canright and Patti Stites from the Diamond C Team at Crown Realty for providing our treats the past three Saturdays.

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received from USD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce. I was asked to be the guest speaker at the Spring Hill Chamber monthly meeting last week and it was a great opportunity to promote our market with the local businesses. They were very supportive and wanting to get involved. Thanks to Ann Jensen for always promoting our market.

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings.

The Ruddy Rhubarb

Botanically speaking, rhubarb is a leafy stalk and so belongs to the realm of vegetables. But culinarily, it belongs to the realm of fruit. It is sometimes described as “red celery” for its resemblance to that other leafy stalk or more poetically, as “the harbinger of spring” because it is one of the first fruits to appear after frost. Its nickname, “pie plant” aptly describes its use in the kitchen, where the stalk (not the leaf which is toxic) is employed as filling for pies, cobblers and crisps or as an ingredient in mixed jams and dessert sauces paired with ginger, orange or its most common companion – strawberry.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Sauce

 

1# rhubarb stalks, trimmed cut into ½ inch pieces (about 4 cups)

2 cups strawberries, hulled, rinsed and halved

1 cup sugar (more or less to taste depending on how sweet/tart you like it)

3 tablespoons water

Combine all the ingredients in a nonreactive saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to medium/low, cover the pan and cook – stirring frequently until rhubarb is tender – about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Use right away or chill. Will keep in the refrigerator for up to two weeks for freeze for longer storage.

Variations: (1)for a less sweet sauce use 5 cups of rhubarb per 1 cup of sugar (2) add orange zest or juice concentrate to taste for a citrus flavor.

Taken from Smith and Hawkens – Gardners’ Community Cookbook, compiled and edited by Victoria Wise (1999)

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May 15th ~ After-Market Newsletter:

It was a cool and rainy day for Spring Hill Farmers Market on Saturday. However our policy is to be open – rain or shine- so our vendors braved the weather and so did our customers. Those that came out were glad they did. George Wright and Nancy Kalman had some great produce. There were fresh picked red and white radishes, green and purple asparagus, and green onions as well as vegetable and flowering bedding plants. Peg Hill and Beth Cupp had several varieties of sweet breads including banana, blueberry and apple butter flavors as well as muffins and brownies and some delicious jams, jelly and preserves. Claudia Beverlin sent her husband (Lonnie)and son to market with her delicious European artesian breads; crusty French, rye with caraway seeds as well as white and wheat. The Beverlins also offer farms fresh eggs and some assorted frozen pork products. Chris Oliver (O’s Jelly) had several varieties of homemade jelly. His flavors are unique and can be used for so much more than layering on bread or toast. The jalapeño jelly can be used with cream cheese as an appetizer and I overheard he and Lonnie trading recipes on how it could be used in cooking. John and Connie Murphy (Connie’s Potting Shed) had fabulous flower bouquets in 3 different sizes. Connie’s flowers are always so amazing. They change with the season, but this week they included huge iris and peonies. Brian Lami had an assortment of baked goods that are always popular. Lisa Kobel has an array of hand knitted items that have developed quite a loyal customer base.  We have 15 registered vendors to date and I am receiving additional inquiries every week. In coming weeks we will be adding several vendors with additional produce, fruits, nuts, hand crafted canes and walking sticks, and coffee that is roasted and packaged locally. Make it a point to stop by every Saturday and see what is new.

Why Eat Local?

There are so many reasons to become a “localvore” – a person who eats food grown or produced locally or within a certain radius such as 50, 100, or 150 miles of their community.

First, you can taste the difference. At a farmers’ market, most local produce has been picked within the past 24 hours. It comes to you ripe, fresh, and with its full flavor, unlike commercially purchased food that may have been picked weeks or months before. Close-to-home foods can also be bred for taste, rather than withstanding the abuse of shipping or industrial harvesting. Second, know what you’re eating. Buying food today is complicated. What pesticides were used? Is that corn genetically modified? Was that chicken free range or did it grow up in a box? People who eat locally find it easier to get answers. Many build relationships with farmers whom they trust. And when in doubt, they can drive out to the farms and see for themselves. Third, meet your neighbors. Local eating is social. Studies show that people shopping at farmers’ markets have 10 times more conversations than their counterparts at the supermarket. Fourth, get in touch with the seasons. When you eat locally, you eat what’s in season. You’ll remember that cherries are the taste of summer. Even in winter, comfort foods like squash soup and pancakes just make sense–a lot more sense than flavorless cherries from the other side of the world. Fifth, discover new flavors. Be adventurous and try okra, cantaloupe, heirloom tomatoes, eggplant, sweet potatoes and acorn squash. They are all part of the KS Farmers Market Savor the Season promotion in 2010. Sixth, explore your home. Visiting local farms is a way to be a tourist on your own home turf. Seventh, be environmentally conscious. .A  study in Iowa found that a regional diet consumed 17 times less oil and gas than a typical diet based on food shipped across the country. Eighth, support small farms. We discovered that many people from all walks of life dream of working the land–maybe you do too. In areas with strong local markets, the family farm is reviving.  Ninth, give back to the local economy. Dollars spent at a local farmers market usually remain in the local economy and become reinvested. Tenth, be healthy. When you eat more fruits and vegetables and fewer processed products, sample a wider variety of foods, and eat more fresh food at its nutritional peak it has to be better for you. Eleventh, create memories. Going to a local farmers market can be a destination event for the entire family; both educational and memorable. We have one customer/family that developed such a relationship with our vendor that they packed up the kids and went to the farm and helped pick green beans last summer. The kids are still talking about their day at the farm.  References taken in part from http://100milediet.org/why-eat-local.

Market and the Community

 

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. On May 22nd a team of SH City employees will be hosting a bake sale to raise funds for their participation in the Relay for Life race. Later this summer the team will be walking from 6  pm to 6 am in support of this cause. Please stop by their booth and lend your support.

Additionally, we are so pleased to have the Cole-Smith Post 350 of the American Legion joining us on a weekly basis. They will be selling raffle tickets on a telescoping flag pole and giving away a free flag at market in June, July, August and September. Stop by and chat with them and pick up a ticket for the free flag drawings. Also, if you have a torn or worn flag that needs to be “retired” you can leave it with them for proper handling. These guys do so many great things in the community it is an honor to have them as a part of our market.

In coming weeks the Festival Choral Society will be selling tickets for their upcoming “Ol Blue Eye” Dinner Theater Benefit, June 19th. The Festival Choral Society is a 501C3 nonprofit community choral arts organization and is incorporated by the State of Kansas. Organized in 2005, the choir and ensemble have performed Christmas and Spring concerts for our community as well as performing with professional musicians and vocalists for the benefit of having such talent for their audiences to hear and experience. Membership of the choir and ensemble stretches from all over our area, including, Spring Hill, Louisburg, Paola, Gardner, and the Greater Kansas City area. Their concerts are made possible through fundraising and the generous support of individuals, area businesses and civic organizations. This is an encore presentation that sold out last year. Seating is limited so make sure and get your tickets early. Advance sales only.

The Market also provides a weekly stall for local business participation. These businesses have the opportunity to promote their products and services and in return generously provide the doughnuts for our vendors and customers. Thanks to Art Canright and Patti Stites from the Diamond C Team at Crown Realty for providing our treats the past two Saturdays. We also want to recognize Walt Faber with Vista Signs for all the support he provides the market with its signage. Walt also offers discounts to any vendor that needs banners or signs for their stall.

Friends of the Market

Our Farmers Market is a community service project sponsored by the Spring Hill Lions Club. We are also thankful for the additional support we received fromUSD 230 and the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce.

 

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings.

Radish Salad – Courtesy of Grow Magazine Vol 3 2010

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ cup granulated sugar

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

2 cups sliced radishes

Combine first 6 ingredients in a bowl – until well blended. Add radishes and toss lightly. Cover and chill for 1 hour before serving.

Grilled Asparagus

1# fresh asparagus washed and ends trimmed

Olive oil, salt and pepper

Toss asparagus oil, salt and pepper in a Ziploc bag.

Grill over medium heat until just tender. Do not overcook allow to blacken.


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The Spring Hill Farmers Market opened for the 2010 season on Saturday, May 8th, 2010. Part of the festivities was a customer drawing for a beautiful  hanging basket. The winner was Leslie Birmingham from Spring Hill.

Spring Hill Farmers Market - Give-Away Winner - May 8, 2010May 8, 2010 – Hanging-Basket giveaway WINNER
Leslie Birmingham holds her prize aloft!

May 8, 2010 ~ After-Market Newsletter:

Spring Hill Farmers Market opened for the 2010 season on Saturday, May 8th.  It was unseasonably cool and a little windy but everyone that attended had a great time.  We presently have 15 registered vendors and several others that will be joining us as the season progresses. Remember, we are a “producer’s market” and our vendors all live and garden within 50 miles of Spring Hill so the weather greatly influences what produce our vendors have to offer. As the weather warms and the season progresses, so will the variety of fruits and vegetables available. However, we have so much more than just produce. We have several vendors that offer home baked treats; including cookies, muffins, brownies, sweet breads and European style artesian breads.  We have home-made jams and jellies, vegetable bedding plants, beautiful cut flower bouquets, honey and bee products, crafts designed for kids, hand knitted items and much more…It seems like every week there is something new and different so make it a point to visit often. We have many customers that come to market every Saturday – It is just part of their summer routine. We offer complimentary coffee and donuts at the Market Manager’s stall, so stop by and get a cup of coffee and then walk around and shop, get to know our vendors and visit with your friends and neighbors.

Congratulations to Leslie Birmingham from Spring Hill. Leslie was the winner of the gorgeous hanging basket door prize from the opening day drawing donated by the market. We hope you enjoy it. You can see a picture of Leslie and her basket on our web page at www.springhillmarket.org.

Market and the Community

 

Our market welcomes and encourages community involvement. We reserve a complimentary stall every week for any church, civic organization, non-profit etc. to have the opportunity to introduce themselves, conduct approved fundraising or just increase their presence in the community. On May 22nd a team of SH City employees will be hosting a bake sale to raise funds for their participation in the Relay for Life race. Later this summer the team will be walking from 6  pm to 6 am in support of this cause. Please stop by their booth and lend your support.

Additionally, we are so pleased to have the Cole-Smith Post 350 of the American Legion joining us on a weekly basis. They will be selling raffle tickets on a telescoping flag pole and giving away a free flag at market in June, July, August and September. Stop by and chat with them and pick up a ticket for the free flag drawings. Also, if you have a torn or worn flag that needs to be “retired” you can leave it with them for proper handling. These guys do so many great things in the community it is an honor to have them as a part of our market.

Friends of the Market

The Spring Hill Farmers Market is so thankful to all those who offer support. Many thanks to USD 230 for the use of the elementary school parking lot and their ongoing support of our market.

From Market to Table

Here are some suggestions for fresh and flavorful additions to your menus using seasonal market offerings.

Mint is abundant this time of year and can be used to enhance both food and beverages. Here is a recipe for a delicious, refreshing beverage:

Minty Lemon Tea – Courtesy of Southern Lady Magazine (July/August 2009)

3 quarts cold water – divided

3 family size tea bags

1/2 – 1 cup fresh mint leaves (depending on your preference for a minty taste)

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 (12 oz) can frozen lemonade concentrate – thawed

Garnish: fresh lemon slices and fresh mint sprigs

In a medium saucepan, bring 1 quart water to a boil. Remove from heat and add tea bags and mint. Cover and steep for 5 minutes. Strain tea into a large pitcher. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Add lemonade and remaining water. Stir to combine well. Cover and chill. Serve over ice and garnish as desired.

(SEE OUR LIST of Registered Vendors and Their Seasonal Offerings)

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May 6, 2010

It’s finally here! Spring Hill Farmers Market opens for the 2010 season on Saturday, May 8th at 7:30 in the Elementary School Parking lot on Webster. I have been corresponding with potential new and returning vendors and it promises to be a great season. We will have a selection of seasonal fresh vegetables, small fruits, jams and jellies, honey and bee items, fresh cut flowers, handcrafted soaps and lotion bars, bedding plants, baked breads and sweet breads and artesian breads. All of our vendors live and garden within a 50 mile radius of Spring Hill so as the season progresses our selection changes and increases. Come weekly and see what is new!  And yes……later in the season we will have an abundance of tomatoes and sweet corn!

As in years past, we will be providing complimentary coffee at the Market Manager’s stall. Please stop by for a cup and then walk around and enjoy the market. One of the nicest things about a farmers market is the opportunity to build a relationship with the vendors.  Our vendors are extremely knowledgeable – some are certified Master Gardeners – and they are more than happy to answer your questions about their products. They will explain how it was grown, harvested and in many cases offer suggestions on how to prepare your purchase.  Our vendors return week after week and year after year so many have developed long term relationships and a loyal customer base.

Because we are striving to be a community event we welcome and encourage other non-profits and civic organizations to join us at market as a way to introduce themselves to the community. Each week we will offer a complimentary stall to those interested. Please contact the market manager to get your group on the calendar.  I would especially like to thank two organizations for their ongoing support of this market….USD 230 for allowing us the use of their parking lot. As we all know a big part of a successful market is location, location, location….and lots of parking. Also many thanks to the Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce for their unwavering support.

I look forward to getting to know each and every one of you during the next few months.

See you at market,

Patti Stites

Market Manager

592-2055

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March 2010

With this warm, spring weather I can’t stop thinking about the beginning of market season. I attended a Farmers Market workshop in Topeka, in February, and am anxious to try out some new and exciting ideas. The Spring Hill Farmers Market will open on Saturday, May 8th at 7:30 welcoming both new and returning vendors.  Mark your calendars now for this fun filled event!

The Spring Hill Farmers Market remains a “producers only” market that offers homegrown, homemade or handcrafted items that come from within a 50 mile radius of Spring Hill. The only “resale” of products allowed, are fundraising initiatives by local non-profits, on a limited basis.  This guarantees our customers the highest quality merchandise and protects our local vendors. Many of our vendors have been with us since the market started over 10 years ago and have a loyal customer base that returns week after week and year after year.  We offer fresh vegetables, seasonal fruit, herbs, cut flowers, jams and jellies, fresh baked breads and pastry, honey and handcrafted items.

We are also one of the most community oriented markets in the area, offering complimentary coffee every Saturday morning, customer appreciation cook-outs and door prizes. Don’t miss opening day. It is Mother’s Day weekend and we will have some beautiful hanging baskets available for purchase and give-away.

Remember, when you shop at your local farmers market you are not only eating fresh foods that were picked within the past 24 hours, not treated with preservatives, and transported hundreds of miles,  you are also supporting your local community of growers – your friends and neighbors.  Make a pact to eat “fresh and local” this summer.  It is the right thing to do on so many levels – you’ll be glad you did.

Watch you inbox for more news as market opening gets closer…..and check out our new Facebook page (Spring Hill Farmers Market) and our webpage (SpringHillMarket.org) which is in the process of being updated.

Please let me hear from you if you know of potential vendors, activities or just have some ideas on how we can continue to grow our market. I look forward to seeing each of you again this year.

See You At Market,

Patti Stites – Market Manager

(816)853-6725 – Cell